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BABE #99, BECKY MORGAN, Founder + Interior Designer @ Bmorcreative, Inc.



Becky is an absolute badass. She's a licensed commercial interior designer who specializes in historic preservation with a focus on small business, and she's located right here in the heart of Jacksonville (where she works from the attic of her historic Springfield home - how fitting.) We're so honored she took the time to give us such a comprehensive look into her day-to-day work in the Commercial Interior Design industry. Thanks, Becky! You're a total babe.

Click here to check out the full interview.

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